Activity A. An educator's journey.

MOVE THIS TO CHAPTER ONE AND LINK TO IT

My coworkers and I used The Educator's Journey in the Popular Education and Activism Working Group we had in the mid 1990's. I found it helped me better understand my fellow teacher/activists and helped me place my current work as a teacher in the context of my experience. (The activity is universal in popular education. I first learned it from Joao Paulo and Eleanora Castano Ferreira in a workshop for teachers at the old ILGWU Worker-Family Education Program.)

Activity 1.4 Working group.

The best way to study popular education is to experience it both as a facilitator and as a participant. Try it out in a small group of people who share your interest. I was lucky to be part of a working group of teachers and organizers who came together to study popular education and organizing. (Their names are all over this handbook!). Popular educators need to create our own contexts, our own support, our own 'schools' in order to deepen and extend our work.

Activity 7.2 Their Power Line and Ours: assessing strength and progress

By Matt Noyes (in collaboration with David Levin, David Pratt, and Steve Downs)

Okay, you have organized a rank-and-file reform group in your union. You are active and presenting a real challenge to the existing union administration. But how strong are you? How strong is the administration that you are challenging? How has your strength (and theirs) been changing? What are your weaknesses? What are theirs? Does everyone in your group share the same assessment? What are the implications for your strategy?

Activity 6.1 When participants take over: from education to action

By Matt Noyes (and participants in the National Carpenters conference.)

ADJUSTMENTS COMMITTEE HERE

REWRITE THIS AS A CASE STUDY WITH WHAT WOULD YOU DO TYPE QUESTIONS

(Like much good popular education, this case was the result of painstaking collaborative planning and a spontaneous rebellion of the participants. Thanks to carpenters Michael Cranmer, Susan Cranmer, and Ken Little, to activist writer Dan LaBotz, to Carl Biers, Jane Latour, and Andy Piascik of AUD, and to Mike Orrfelt, popular educator, journalist, carpenter and building trades activist.)

Summary:

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