List of games from Kani Club

  • Me-You
  • Rhythm shiritori
  • Don't get left behind (ひとりにならない)
  • Word Association
  • Let's do it!
  • Yes, and yay
  • Yes, and... interview
  • Master and Slaves
  • One Voice
  • One Word
  • A,B,C,D
  • Entry/Exit
  • Freeze Tag
  • Song
  • Emotional Replay
  • Genre Replay
  • Words from the heart
  • Superhero
  • Papers
  • Musical
  • Typewriter
  • Space Jump
  • Feeling Shift (mime of day's event)
  • Experience Rendering (sound, motion, statue)
  • Mime -- what's my job?
  • Mime -- who am I? (variation, try to join in, rebuff if wrong)

Six degrees of curiosity

I adapted this from Sonya Huber's "Six Degrees" experiment. (She calls activities "experiments" which I like, in her great Backwards Research Guide for Writers; Augusto Boal calls them "games," emphasizing the element of play.)

The John Guare play "Six Degrees of Separation" popularized the idea that each person on the planet is connected to every other person by no more than five other people. Guare used the idea to examine the ties that bind each person to each other person and the play between our unity and our separation.

Plastic Bag Education

The idea is to take a random object that is utterly familiar but considered unimportant and use it as an object of learning, finding the connections between that object and ourselves. (Reminds me of Marx's question in Volume One of Capital about how two objects can be made commensurable.)

Step one is just to take the bag and answer the question: What do you see? This step requires time and care, it should be detailed and very specific, a close description, a close reading.

Dedocracia -- consensus decision-making with fingers.

Dedocracia is a pun I learned from activists from the Dominican Republic with whom I used to work. When someone designates the person who has to carry out a particular assignment -- by pointing at him/her rather than voting or reaching consensus -- it's a case of "dedocracia" (the rule of the finger).

But I have since learned about another form of dedocracia: five finger consensus, or "fist-to-five consensus-building." You can read about it here: http://freechild.org/Firestarter/Fist2Five.htm

Broken Squares

Adapted from "Broken Squares": Preparing Students for Group Work, from Practicing Collaborative Learning, Maryann Feola Castelucci and Peter Miller, College of Staten Island, CUNY, Dept of English, Speech and World Literature, Winter 1986

Activity 2.6 Broken Squares

NEEDS WORK!!!!! LOST TEXT

Adapted from "Broken Squares": Preparing Students for Group Work, from Practicing Collaborative Learning, Maryann Feola Castelucci and Peter Miller, College of Staten Island, CUNY, Dept of English, Speech and World Literature, Winter 1986

[write up activity in context: how to develop group building skills when collaboration, participation, equality are your priorities, this is deep work, but can be very useful]
Summary:

Activity 4.6 Consensus Decision-Making for Unions

By Matt Noyes; the cuento vivo technique on which this is based comes from Alforja, Tomo I.

Summary:
Just like the parliamentary procedure that most unions use, in one form or another, an alternative democratic procedure for making decisions needs to be learned and practiced before it becomes efficient. Using a "Cuento Vivo" (live story) technique, this activity has people act out a scene from a union meeting using consensus instead of voting. The scripted parts help people practice the technique and shows how the procedure is designed to work.

Materials:

Feel free

This is not so much an activity or technique as a policy. But, it has implications for facilitation and for participants' actions.

At the outset of a course or workshop, as part of my self-introduction, I explain that there is one general rule that is very important to me, that is that everyone should feel free. (This is constantly evolving as I learn more about what feeling free can mean.)

The spiel:

People should feel free to be comfortable:

  • to stand up if they need to stand up,
  • to leave the room if they need to leave the room,

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